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john wayne movies weren't realistic as much, but they're very patriotic and they give you a sense of, "hey, you know, i want to go do that." (music playing) i'd come out of theater having seen some of these old films, movies like "pork chop hill" and "to hell and back" with audie murphy, "sands of iwo jima" with john wayne, i'd come out having -- feeling a peculiar thing. the peculiar thing was i wanted to play war. (tim o'brien) and i remember being with my little buddies, we'd go out to the golf course and pretend we were john wayne. (patriotic music playing) when you've got john wayne, you've already got history right there in front of you embodied in one character. he carries himself as a walking convention. (gene michaud) he's the older, wiser enlisted. he has to train young recruits and he has to be the father. if it's in the line of duty, i'll do what you tell me to do. but as far as my personal life, keep your hands off. that's the same thing your father would tell you. and i wouldn't have listened to him either. that's right. you never did. how do you know? he told me. wayne
importance than a masterpiece by raphael." john adams said, "the age of painting and sculpture has not arrived in this country, and i hope it will not arrive soon. i would not give a sixpence for a picture of raphael." nevertheless, admiration for the artist became so great th copies of his works grew in number, especially of the madonna of the chair. merchants and landowners placed these copies in rooms filled with family portraits and memorabilia. unlike jefferson's monticello, the copy after raphael might now be the only art relating to an old master in the room. the attitude toward raphael changed during the 19th century. through prints and the new medium of photography, copies of his sistine madonna and other works proliferated. once mass-produced, they were no longer a mark of taste and distinction but symbolized their owner's moral as well as artistic values. eventually, raphael's images became so commonplace they were fair game for parody. in the late 19th century, a new, more sophisticated type of collector arose in america: the millionaire who, having amassed a fortune, w
Search Results 0 to 1 of about 2